Hi! I'm new here. Will the parakeets be easily injured at home?

ARochester

New member
Sep 8, 2021
1
3
New York
Parrots
Cockatiel, parakeet
Hello everyone, there are my parakeet couples, I call them Sparrow Magpie.
For a long time, I just kept them in a cage. But recently, I just think about releasing them to fly at home, but I don't know if they will be easily injured outside her cage, such as bruises, or accidentally eating something, so I don't dare to release them for the time being.
Are there any suggestions that I need to pay attention to?

Thank you.

IMG_1565.JPG
 

Tikitiel

Well-known member
Sep 21, 2021
854
Media
1
426
Riyadh
Parrots
Lutino cockatiel (Tiki)
2 baby sparrows
Millet
Pidgey
**RIP**
Tango the sun conure
Flintch the baby sparrow
Chris the scarlet macaw
DONT let them out of the cage they can injure themselves quite badly escpesially if the house is not bird proofed ,instead an outdoor aviary or an indoor one would be better?
or a bird room that is bird proofed
i would recommend a cage upgarde non the less
a flight cage would be better or any cage that is bigger
and switching out the dowl perches/sticks into natural would also be better for thier feet!
adding some toys that they can shred or forage with would be the best
i wont say anything about the diet because you might be trying your hardest to switch to pellets and veg
non the less they are very cute!
 

Emeral

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
63
121
Parrots
Hanhs Macaw
Hello everyone, there are my parakeet couples, I call them Sparrow Magpie.
For a long time, I just kept them in a cage. But recently, I just think about releasing them to fly at home, but I don't know if they will be easily injured outside her cage, such as bruises, or accidentally eating something, so I don't dare to release them for the time being.
Are there any suggestions that I need to pay attention to?

Thank you.
Hello everyone, there are my parakeet couples, I call them Sparrow Magpie.
For a long time, I just kept them in a cage. But recently, I just think about releasing them to fly at home, but I don't know if they will be easily injured outside her cage, such as bruises, or accidentally eating something, so I don't dare to release them for the time being.
Are there any suggestions that I need to pay attention to?

Thank you.

View attachment 31348

Hello everyone, there are my parakeet couples, I call them Sparrow Magpie.
For a long time, I just kept them in a cage. But recently, I just think about releasing them to fly at home, but I don't know if they will be easily injured outside her cage, such as bruises, or accidentally eating something, so I don't dare to release them for the time being.
Are there any suggestions that I need to pay attention to?

Thank you.

View attachment 31348
Hello and welcome

It's nice of you to think of letting them have fun and excercise. And also to make sure they do not hurt themselves. I like your good intentions, so, let's talk about how to....

1) bird proof the room, this is for their safety



2) their fitness, more excercise, healthier birds....


3) Since, small cage limits their movements, there are things to be concern. My guess is that at the beginning, they may not be fit enough to fly well due to lack of practice. And that they may fly into the glass windows. Birds do not know that the glass is there blocking their path.

Prepare closed boxes or a chair or a pot of plant with branches next to the cage. Let them get used to these new items for at least a few days. The bird can land or hop on these items easily if they can not fly well.

My guess is that at the beginning, they may not be fit enough to fly well due to lack of practice. And that they may fly into the glass windows. Birds do not know the glass is there blocking their path.

I also recommend a bigger cage, as big as possible, with ropes or tree branches to climb inside their cage.
 

Emeral

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
63
121
Parrots
Hanhs Macaw
When you're ready, bird proof the room, closing all windows and doors, be ready to stay with them at all times.

I recommend bringing the cage to the closed windows. Knocking on the glass to show them that these are hard, do not try to fly into it.

Prepare their favorite food, open the cage door and see if they hop out or fly out.

...If they are slow to come out, give them more time to adjust.
...If they hop out, it means they are not skilled enough to fly. But no worries, they will be getting more skilled soon. Let them hop on items close by their cage. In a week or two...they will be a lot stronger
...If they fly out, they are in very good health. Just let them have fun.

Prepare a long stick or a tree branch, for the bird to perch on. Some new flyer can fly up but maybe too afraid to fly down. This stick can help bring them down.

when they are thirsty or hungry, they will go back to their cage to eat and drink inside. (This may take an hour or more)
So you can close the door then.

Hope they can excercise everyday, hope this helps
 

fiddlejen

Supporting Member
Mar 28, 2019
1,151
Media
11
672
New England
Parrots
Sunny the Sun Conure (sept '18, gotcha 3/'19). Mr Jefferson Budgie & Mrs Calliope Budgie (albino) (nov'18 & jan'19). Summer 2021 Baby Budgies: Riker (Green); Patchouli, Keye, & Tiny (blue greywings).
I recommend also, preparing the room with dark window coverings available. Birds will commonly go back to their cages at nighttime, or at least will resist less. IF you have trouble getting them to return to their cage, then you can start covering the windows and darkening the room.

As far as the room itself. The first concern is entrapment hazards. Look around the room and ponder whether there is any place for the birds to get trapped. Look out especially for places they could go Under or Into, from which you might not be able to retrieve them without injuring them. Block off any such places.

Beyond that, remove any potential poisons of course, anything they could fall into and drown, and realize you will need to immediately learn and follow doors-closed protocols. Both -- keeping all doors & windows (or windowscreens) fully closed at all times, and also, Checking Tops of Every Door before Ever Closing it.

That said, letting them out is gonna be best. Many many people have their birds as pets that are allowed to free-fly, with limitations, within their homes. Limitations might include, only in a particular room, only during particular times, etc. Freedom (even if limited) to fly is best for their emotional and physical health, if safely possible.

My budgies are allowed the freedom of two full rooms during the day. I love watching them swoop around in aerial acrobatics, and choose different windows to perch and look outside. (I have only been able to bird-safe two of my rooms, as I am otherwise a bit of a clutterbug.) My conure's cage is left open, but she mostly only chooses to come out with me, so she is allowed to accompany throughout the house, if she wishes.
 

widor

New member
Aug 23, 2021
10
Media
1
23
Hungary
Parrots
2 Green Check Conures
Think if you are prepared you can try ,actually it is also good question how old are they? If they are young they can adjust and learn but with older ones I also heard that if a bird does not get a chance to fly in their early years than they can struggle.( We had a budgie inherited from my grandma when she died .Poor thing was kept in a small cage for years ,without any flying experience. When we got him I tried to let him out but it was a disaster .He kept falling and banging into walls..etc so for his safety I gave up. Actually with my experience in parrot keeping I feel really quilty -only we would have been known better)
 

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