Male pineapple conures frighten when showering

Lifeofqtpiandgj

New member
Mar 1, 2021
4
0
Orange County, CA
Parrots
2 pineapple conures
Hi all,

I’ve grown up with parakeets cockatiels and finches and this is my first time with pineapple conures. The oldest is 1 year the youngest is almost 9 months both are DNA tested both males. Lately what has been happening is the youngest will shower and the older one will try to go next and the baby tries to make him leave by yelling then they both do and start to bite and grab each other’s feet (I’m thinking they are fighting) so I split them up. And the one I don’t grab wll fly to my head while both still yelling.

Are they fighting? If so, what can I do to prevent this from happening. They have 3 different places that they like to bathe in (we bought the other two after the first fight In case they were trying to claim the one bath)

There hasn’t been any blood but I have found 3 small feathers that I’m sure happened during the fight.

Any tips or feedback is greatly appreciated.
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
12,593
10,702
USA
Parrots
Full house
Do postive association with each other.
Going after feet is trying to make one leave or move. Increase the number of hs g out spots and perches.

I might be able to find introduction articles, I look.
 

Laurasea

Well-known member
Aug 2, 2018
12,593
10,702
USA
Parrots
Full house
Ok I copied this
This is from a member of tge forum from a few years ago.

" The best advice I can give you is how we 'teach' the birds at the shelter to at the very least, tolerate each other. Birds will always have opinions in who they like best, but you can 'teach' them to get along. (I am putting teach in inverted commas here, as you can't really teach them, you can associate treats with being around that particular bird. (; )

Try to limit inter-bird interaction to around 15-20 minutes. During this time, feed many treats to both birds, and repeat this for around about two weeks, or however long it takes for the birds to associate treats with each other. (this doesn't have to be every day).

After you're confident that the birds won't hurt or attack each other, try putting the treat in a food bowl where the birds have to ''share' the treats. If one bird lunges or shows annoyance, move them to another play stand/perch. Hopefully at least two of your birds will do this, therefore showing the troublesome bird that getting along = treats. Try gain the next day.

This process is all about repetition and slow introduction. I would say that here at the shelter, this method works around about 75 - 85% of the time. If it doesn't work for you (as it all depends on your birds) there are certainly other ways, but this is probably the easiest and best for the birds. Hope that all your birds get along nicely and become a big, happy flock!"

And this
http://trainedparrot.com/Introducing_Parrots/
 

Tman

New member
Jan 3, 2021
100
7
Las Vegas Nv.
Parrots
Galah. Axel
Rescued budgie Anna RIP
Have you tried to let the older one shower without the younger around?
Just thought I would ask. Try what Laura has for you but add what I have suggested might help.
 

birdiemama

New member
May 11, 2020
40
3
Las Vegas
Parrots
Doobie, a Pineapple Green Cheek Conure baby about 6 weeks old (on May 11, 2020)
If it was me, I'd just take turns in the shower... one day with this one, one day with the other one. Problem solved!
 
OP
L

Lifeofqtpiandgj

New member
Mar 1, 2021
4
0
Orange County, CA
Parrots
2 pineapple conures
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Thank you I will see what more I can do. This was helpful. The thing is I thought they were bonded already. But I see now there is still more room
For Improvement




Ok I copied this
This is from a member of tge forum from a few years ago.

" The best advice I can give you is how we 'teach' the birds at the shelter to at the very least, tolerate each other. Birds will always have opinions in who they like best, but you can 'teach' them to get along. (I am putting teach in inverted commas here, as you can't really teach them, you can associate treats with being around that particular bird. (; )

Try to limit inter-bird interaction to around 15-20 minutes. During this time, feed many treats to both birds, and repeat this for around about two weeks, or however long it takes for the birds to associate treats with each other. (this doesn't have to be every day).

After you're confident that the birds won't hurt or attack each other, try putting the treat in a food bowl where the birds have to ''share' the treats. If one bird lunges or shows annoyance, move them to another play stand/perch. Hopefully at least two of your birds will do this, therefore showing the troublesome bird that getting along = treats. Try gain the next day.

This process is all about repetition and slow introduction. I would say that here at the shelter, this method works around about 75 - 85% of the time. If it doesn't work for you (as it all depends on your birds) there are certainly other ways, but this is probably the easiest and best for the birds. Hope that all your birds get along nicely and become a big, happy flock!"

And this
Trained Parrot Blog - How to Introduce Parrots to Get Along
 

Most Reactions

Latest posts

Top