Need help with my two green cheeks!

Nikitten

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I've had my two gcc's for around two years now. One is definitely female as she has laid and egg and the sex of the other is unknown. However, both eggs were infertile(I torched them to check). I got them together from someone who could no longer take care of them and they have stayed in the same cage together since. They mated on occasion but it increased at the start of the year and was probably daily. Next thing I knew, there was an egg. I had left it for 2 weeks or so and removed it. They had no interest in it and barely went near it. I didn't think much of it but now things have turned for the worse :( my female had plucked feathers from her chest which I discovered was a common thing for pregnant birds. Yesterday I came home to find her sitting at the bottom of the cage, very lethargic and fluffed up. I thought it was a respiratory infection and took it to my vet which deals with all animals although they didn't know much about birds to be honest. So I was given antibiotics anyway. Today I discovered she had laid another egg that was very soft and squishy. She is fine now but upon more research I think she may have been egg bound :( this really scares me as I know it can result in death. Tomorrow I plan to get calcium blocks and cuttlefish bone to provide extra calcium. I've come to this forum however to get opinions on whether I should separate the two in different cages and take turns letting them out or should I keep them together ? I'm afraid she'll get egg bound again and it won't go as well this time :( I have no avian vets in my area also. Thanks for reading and please provide any feedback you have
 

SilverSage

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Separate them.

Usually I don't suggest that, but right now her life is in danger. You need to do everything you can to disrupt her hormonal drive to reproduce ASAP.

I'm glad you will be adding calcium to hr diet but keep in mind, the calcium doesn't go straight from digestion to eggs; the calcium from eggs is pulled from the long bones of the hen. So she is already suffering a MAJOR AND DANGEROUS calcium deficiency if her eggs are soft. Resist the urge to add calcium supplements to her food though, as you can overdose her and cause organ damage. If she absolutely refuses to chew the blocks and cuttle bones, just scrape a little of it onto her food (NOT WATER) each day. Unfortunately I don't ha e time to get I to everything at this moment, but I'm attaching my article on hormone control. Every egg she lays in this state has the potential to kill her so please take this seriously.

http://www.silversageaviaries.com/handlinghormones/


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Nikitten

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Thank you :) I will get a new cage today and separate them. I feel bad but if it's what has to be done, it has to be done.
 

SilverSage

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Eclectus, CAG, BH Pionus, Maximilian’s Pionus, Quakers, Indian Ringnecks, Green Cheeked Conures, Black Capped Conures, Cockatiels, Lovebirds, Budgies, Canaries, Diamond Doves, Zebra Finches, Society F
It really does. Her life is in danger. In a few months once this has been dealt with they should be able to live together again.

I also need to address the plucking. While out of control hormones can contribute to plucking it's important to know that just because plucking is COMMON doesn't mean it is NORMAL, especially in a GCC.

Plucking is a sign that something has gone extremely wrong; almost always more than one thing at once. It can become an unbreakable habit in some birds even after the problem in solved, and in some birds it's impossible to determine what went wrong to start with or if the issue has been fixed, so never judge an owner by the feathers of his bird, but plucking is a huge red flag. I have personally rehabbed 4 pluckers, and was recently stunned to find one of my own dear pets beginning to pluck. An emergency vet visit reviewed an infection and she has stopped plucking now.

It will be harder to address with no AVIAN VET near you, but there are a lot of people here who are willing to help. Never hesitate to ask a question!


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Nikitten

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Yeah I'm going to continue the baytril antibiotics for remaining 5 days as a precaution. She hasn't plucked anymore so fingers crossed I get it sorted out. Thank you so much for all the help :) I'll keep you updated
 

EllenD

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SilverSage has said it all, and hormone control is the key to this. Search "Solar Schedule" and try to get both of your birds on this ASAP. This will knock them out of breeding mode in a matter of a week or two, and should stop the egg laying. As already mentioned I would do your best to find the certified avian vet closest to you, whether it be a few hours away or not, because if she does become egg bound and cannot lay the egg on her own, except for the few things you can try to do to help her, you'll need an avian vet immediately to save her life. It's a matter of hours typically that you have to get her help in that situation, so I'd have an emergency plan ready. I'd also try to get both birds to see the certified avian vet that you find for a wellness check-up and tests, and plan a yearly trip for this same reason.

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GaleriaGila

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About light and hoormones... I always like to add this...
Ever since the Rickeybird hit sexual maturity at about 3-4 years of age, I've had to manage his hormones! If kept on too steady a long day, and too much light, he stayed "in the mood" (aggressive, even louder than usual, pleasuring himself on my neck ) year round. If I keep him on a natural light schedule... up with dawn, down with dusk, year around... THEN he's only a little monster rooster from July to September). He has his own room, so I can do that easily.
 
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Nikitten

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Yeah I've been working on that already :) I now have them separated and my sick green cheek is back to her normal self but I know birds are good at hiding illness so I'm still being careful and keeping a close eye. I must research the closest avian vet. Thanks for the advice :)
 
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Nikitten

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@GaleriaGila yeah I've heard it makes the world of difference to their moods :) I'm hoping it also helps my other GCC become less moody. He's always been very protective over my other green cheek,Twinky, and would in turn not take too kindly to me or anyone so I think time apart and a new schedule will do them good :) do you guys recommend moving them to complete separate rooms and not see each other or are they OK being separated in the same room and let out at different times ?
 

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