Sensitive Issue - Any Advice as to how to find a good home for your parrot prior to your demise

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
Hello Very Sensitive Issue
It may sound foolish however I am a planner.
Does anyone have advice as to how to find a loving, lasting home for your Best Friend and my DAV Service Companion.
I am an old guy and Vietnam veteran.
My companion is a 4 year old Solomon Island Eclectus Boy.
My daughters said they will take Moses when I can no longer care for him.
I am reluctant to let them have Moses. They are Great Children however they are cat people. I am afraid Moses who has the run of my house when his feeding time is over (8 am, 12 pm, and 2 feedings in evening starting about 4:40 pm) a fruit and vegetable Kabob may be confined to his enclosure for the rest of his life which will not work for Moses who is used to sharing his home (my house) with me.
I have heard that parrots my become "pluckers" if they are depressed or lonely for companionship.
Please advise as I am open to any real good advice.
thank you and God Bless our companions with Feathers.
Larry Kiceina
 

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clark_conure

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Jul 14, 2017
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A crossover Quaker Scuti (F), A Sun conure named AC, A Cinnamon Green Cheek conure Kent, and 6 budgies, Scuti Jr. (f), yellow (m), clark Jr. (m), Dot (f), Zebra(f), Machine (m).
told my family if they can't take care of them to take them to the place I bought my two conures....I know the guy at the parrot shop loves birds and even has boarded my flock before. If my family can't handle them I'm sure my "parrot guy" will keep the bonded birds together and find a good home for them. Not the whole flock but the bonds that seem the strongest.

Sure he might be selling the birds twice, but...I'm ok with that if I know they will be together.
 

Fluffonia

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Aug 4, 2023
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Red sided ekkie female -
Ruby
Hatchingday- 14th of May, 2023
Do you know any Bird-slaves in your country? Like friends, for instant. Ekkies are VERY, (in very, I mean, very very very very x99999999999999999999999999999) prone to feather plucking. If you know a bird-slave friend, and your sure that he/she will take care of him, then, you should start moving him there for short amount of time. That way, you could prevent (more or less) feather plucking. Wish you all the luck, Fluff ( my β€˜nickname’) and Ruby. :)
 
OP
azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
told my family if they can't take care of them to take them to the place I bought my two conures....I know the guy at the parrot shop loves birds and even has boarded my flock before. If my family can't handle them I'm sure my "parrot guy" will keep the bonded birds together and find a good home for them. Not the whole flock but the bonds that seem the strongest.

Sure he might be selling the birds twice, but...I'm ok with that if I know they will be together.
Hello
Thank you for the advice.

I obtained Moses by a private person who was only looking to sell Moses because the breeder friend passed away. If i recall I only paid about $250 for a hand fed baby Eclectus, i always wanted one and know theyr for the most part of loving, family oriented and great talkers. My moses actuall asks my wife (Where's Daddy?, she tells him he went out but will be back soon:) then he responds (Come back soon Daddy) she tells him he will be back soon and then he says OK :) thank you for the advice, but cannot take him to a bird shop
 
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azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
Do you know any Bird-slaves in your country? Like friends, for instant. Ekkies are VERY, (in very, I mean, very very very very x99999999999999999999999999999) prone to feather plucking. If you know a bird-slave friend, and your sure that he/she will take care of him, then, you should start moving him there for short amount of time. That way, you could prevent (more or less) feather plucking. Wish you all the luck, Fluff ( my β€˜nickname’) and Ruby. :)
Hello
Sorry I do not know what is a "Bird Slave".
I know Eclectus are very family oriented or at least my Moses is part of the family. I was told if they are away from the family for different reasons they could like other parrots pluck their feathers:(
Here is what i read in the books.
Species that have a high predisposition to feather pick include Timneh African Gray Parrots (TAG) and Congo African Gray Parrots (CAG), Lovebirds, Eclectus parrots, Cockatoos (especially Moluccan, Goffin, Bare-eyed species), Conures, Parrotlets, Monk parakeets, mini-macaws, and to a lesser extent large macaws.

Why do parrots pluck their feathers too much?
Pain: When birds feel pain, they often deal with it improperly, by plucking or chewing the area where they feel the pain. This pain could be as a result of almost anything, from disease to injury to a chronic condition. Behavioral: Boredom, loneliness, or lack of attention often leads to feather plucking.

What are 3 causes of feather plucking?
Behavioral causes of feather-picking may include stress from various sources, including lack of stimulation ('boredom'), sleep deprivation, and sexual frustration. Boredom may result from lack of appropriate toys, not enough foraging opportunities, or not enough interaction with other individuals (human or avian).

Thank you for your suggestion
Larry
 

LaManuka

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Aug 29, 2018
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Queensland, Australia
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Fang ({ab}normal grey cockatiel), Valentino (budgie), Jem (cinnamon cockatiel), Lovejoy(varied lorikeet), Peach (princess parrot)
Hello Very Sensitive Issue
It may sound foolish however I am a planner.
Does anyone have advice as to how to find a loving, lasting home for your Best Friend and my DAV Service Companion.
I am an old guy and Vietnam veteran.
My companion is a 4 year old Solomon Island Eclectus Boy.
My daughters said they will take Moses when I can no longer care for him.
I am reluctant to let them have Moses. They are Great Children however they are cat people. I am afraid Moses who has the run of my house when his feeding time is over (8 am, 12 pm, and 2 feedings in evening starting about 4:40 pm) a fruit and vegetable Kabob may be confined to his enclosure for the rest of his life which will not work for Moses who is used to sharing his home (my house) with me.
I have heard that parrots my become "pluckers" if they are depressed or lonely for companionship.
Please advise as I am open to any real good advice.
thank you and God Bless our companions with Feathers.
Larry Kiceina
@azflcowboy, I don't know if this will be of any help to you, but one of our former moderators wrote this post with pretty much this situation in mind. There are a number of parrot sanctuaries/rescues listed here - as I'm in Australia I don't know if these would be suitable for you in particular, but even if they're not they may know of someone who is......


I wish you the best of luck in your search, and hope that you don't need to avail yourself of a service like this for a VERY long time to come πŸ™
 

DonnaBudgie

Supporting Member
Jan 24, 2023
3,141
3,866
Windham, Maine
Parrots
Budgies. Lotsa Budgies.
Hello Very Sensitive Issue
It may sound foolish however I am a planner.
Does anyone have advice as to how to find a loving, lasting home for your Best Friend and my DAV Service Companion.
I am an old guy and Vietnam veteran.
My companion is a 4 year old Solomon Island Eclectus Boy.
My daughters said they will take Moses when I can no longer care for him.
I am reluctant to let them have Moses. They are Great Children however they are cat people. I am afraid Moses who has the run of my house when his feeding time is over (8 am, 12 pm, and 2 feedings in evening starting about 4:40 pm) a fruit and vegetable Kabob may be confined to his enclosure for the rest of his life which will not work for Moses who is used to sharing his home (my house) with me.
I have heard that parrots my become "pluckers" if they are depressed or lonely for companionship.
Please advise as I am open to any real good advice.
thank you and God Bless our companions with Feathers.
Larry Kiceina
What a beautiful boy!
 

Fluffonia

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2023
232
Media
1
286
Slovenia
Parrots
Red sided ekkie female -
Ruby
Hatchingday- 14th of May, 2023
Hello
Sorry I do not know what is a "Bird Slave".
I know Eclectus are very family oriented or at least my Moses is part of the family. I was told if they are away from the family for different reasons they could like other parrots pluck their feathers:(
Here is what i read in the books.
Species that have a high predisposition to feather pick include Timneh African Gray Parrots (TAG) and Congo African Gray Parrots (CAG), Lovebirds, Eclectus parrots, Cockatoos (especially Moluccan, Goffin, Bare-eyed species), Conures, Parrotlets, Monk parakeets, mini-macaws, and to a lesser extent large macaws.

Why do parrots pluck their feathers too much?
Pain: When birds feel pain, they often deal with it improperly, by plucking or chewing the area where they feel the pain. This pain could be as a result of almost anything, from disease to injury to a chronic condition. Behavioral: Boredom, loneliness, or lack of attention often leads to feather plucking.

What are 3 causes of feather plucking?
Behavioral causes of feather-picking may include stress from various sources, including lack of stimulation ('boredom'), sleep deprivation, and sexual frustration. Boredom may result from lack of appropriate toys, not enough foraging opportunities, or not enough interaction with other individuals (human or avian).

Thank you for your suggestion
Larry
Birb-slaves are us. Bird owners. We are their β€˜slaves’
 

Free as a bird

Well-known member
Jul 29, 2023
270
325
Parrots
2 cockatiels
Hello Very Sensitive Issue
It may sound foolish however I am a planner.
Does anyone have advice as to how to find a loving, lasting home for your Best Friend and my DAV Service Companion.
I am an old guy and Vietnam veteran.
My companion is a 4 year old Solomon Island Eclectus Boy.
My daughters said they will take Moses when I can no longer care for him.
I am reluctant to let them have Moses. They are Great Children however they are cat people. I am afraid Moses who has the run of my house when his feeding time is over (8 am, 12 pm, and 2 feedings in evening starting about 4:40 pm) a fruit and vegetable Kabob may be confined to his enclosure for the rest of his life which will not work for Moses who is used to sharing his home (my house) with me.
I have heard that parrots my become "pluckers" if they are depressed or lonely for companionship.
Please advise as I am open to any real good advice.
thank you and God Bless our companions with Feathers.
Larry Kiceina
Ok sensitive issue calls for a sensitive question... My friend do you have a terminal illness or something? Because in that photo I see a healthy bird and a healthy man. Sure the bird will probably out live you they can live to over 50 I think, but you look like you still have many years left sir... πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ
 
May 2, 2021
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Stormy(M): blue Australian budgie
Picasso(F): green Australian budgie
Apollo(F): sky blue dominant pied Australian budgie
Ok sensitive issue calls for a sensitive question... My friend do you have a terminal illness or something? Because in that photo I see a healthy bird and a healthy man. Sure the bird will probably out live you they can live to over 50 I think, but you look like you still have many years left sir... πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ
I think he’s just trying to make a plan, which is actually really smart of him because, well, some people die suddenly with little warning. None of us really have guaranteed lifespans.

Edit: also other situations, like terminal illness, dementia, etc., where he may not be able to care for his bird even if he is still alive.
 
OP
azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #13
Ok sensitive issue calls for a sensitive question... My friend do you have a terminal illness or something? Because in that photo I see a healthy bird and a healthy man. Sure the bird will probably out live you they can live to over 50 I think, but you look like you still have many years left sir... πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ
Hello Thank you for the advice as I am 74 years young but many issues from serving in Vietnam ove 50 years ago...thank you and God Bless Our Fine Feathered Friends
 

saxguy64

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Staff member
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Apr 24, 2018
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Tucker the Red Sided Eclectus
Baxter the YNA
Avery the CAG
Patches the Grand Eclectus, my best friend. RIP
Cuckoo the BFA RIP
Here's a thread that was started a few years ago. Perhaps it was uncomfortable to talk about, or just informative enough on its own, so there weren't any replies, but there's some good thoughts and resources in there.
 

SailBoat

Supporting Member
Jul 10, 2015
17,477
9,636
Western, Michigan
Parrots
DYH Amazon
Well Hello you old fart! I can say that cause I am older than you are by at least a year! Also a Vet and have my own set of war based shortcomings.

For the care of your loving Parrot and your Dog, contact your Avian and Dog Vet, as they commonly know of great folks that care for such wonderful family members.

From the legal side: get a Living Trust (which sets 'above' a Will) and will shift your assets into the Trust and save you and your dear wife from having your hard work end-up in Probate Court. A well developed Living Trust should require you to pre-plan for both of your care and shift the heartache of funeral arrangements, end-of-life wants (do not provide to a hospital), the care of your feathered and fur family members, etc. It is a demanding undertaking that can take a solid month to bring together. The Laws have changed and as a result a Living Trust is what you want nowadays.

Great ideas from other members above and well worth considering!

Planning is a Great way to address your concerns before they become a Must Do Now thing!

Are you signed-up for Veteran's Health Care? If not make it happen as it takes time for the system to get you enrolled! Standard Military stuff, Hurry Up and Wait!

Thank you for your Service, from a fellow Vet and Parrot Lover!!
 
Last edited:
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azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #16
Well Hello you old fart! I can say that cause I am older than you are by at least a year! Also a Vet and have my own set of war based shortcomings.

For the care of your loving Parrot and your Dod, contact your Avian and Dog Vet, as they commonly know of great folks that care for such wonderful family members.

From the legal side: get a Living Trust (which sets 'above' a Will) and will shift your assets into the Trust and save you and your dear wife from having your hard work end-up in Probate Court. A well developed Living Trust should require you to pre-plan for both of your care and shift the heartache of funeral arrangements, end-of-life wants (do not provide to a hospital), the care of your feathered and fur family members, etc. It is a demanding undertaking that can take a solid month to bring together. The Laws have changed and as a result a Living Trust is what you want nowadays.

Great ideas from other members above and well worth considering!

Planning is a Great way to address your concerns before they become a Must Do Now thing!

Are you signed-up for Veteran's Health Care? If not make it happen as it takes time for the system to get you enrolled! Standard Military stuff, Hurry Up and Wait!

Thank you for your Service, from a fellow Vet and Parrot Lover!!
Hello
Thank you for the good advice.
Yes i am registered with the VA. Actually today i need to file the agent orange registry again.
Thanks for the tips and God Bless
.
Larry aka azflcowboy
 

Jcas

Well-known member
Jan 9, 2023
320
547
Parrots
Quaker, 2 budgies
Thank you for your service ❀️. Moses is very beautiful and you are a wonderful pet guardian for planning for his future. It’s a hard thing to think about, but important. One of the best things you can do to ensure he has a good life if you should pass before him, is to write down, in minute detail, his daily schedule, routine, activities, likes/ dislikes, diet, the words and phrases he knows, favorite toys and foods, silly things he does, any special tricks you have for getting him to do things like step up, be quiet, take medicine, etc, and of course any medical history. Put this list with all of your other important papers and maybe put an extra copy somewhere obvious, like on the refrigerator, in case of emergency. This way, no matter where he goes, his new owner can give him the familiarity of routine.
I say this because I was on the other side of the situation where I took in a Quaker parrot who needed a new home after his owner experienced a sudden, serious medical emergency. He came with his cage, perches, toys, and enough food for a week or two. Other than that, all the info I had on him was that his name was JJ, he was 15-20 years old, had lived with the same person since he was a baby, and a few words/ phrases that he could say. This poor bird’s world was turned completely upside down in a day and I feel like the transition would have been easier if I could have known more about him to start with. However, it’s important to keep in mind that animals are adaptable. I know JJ’s life now must be very different from what it used to be, but eventually he settled in, learned a new routine and is very happy. He never engaged in any self-destructive behaviors like plucking, despite the stress he must have initially felt at all the changes.
Connecting with other bird- lovers on Facebook or other groups or through a veterinarian or local bird events can help you find a potential adoptive home for the future. Any friends you have that Moses likes could be another option. Only you know your family, but IF your daughters are responsible animal- loving people, maybe keep them as an option. If Moses has met them, at least he would be going to someone he knows. Adjustments could be made like putting the cats in another room for a few hours while Moses could come out of his cage to play and interact. Or he could have his own room like my birds do! The door has glass panels so they can still keep any eye on activity outside the room and I interact with them a lot throughout the day. You could possibly discuss these things with your daughters.
If Moses has to go to a new home due to your illness or passing some day, it will be different and, at first, difficult for him. But that doesn’t mean he can’t adjust to some changes and learn to be happy. JJ has shown me that an intelligent, one- person bird can be very happy in a new life. Wishing you and your bird the best as you consider this weighty topic.
 

LoveMyFids

Member
Aug 19, 2023
55
87
Parrots
Meyers, Rock Pebbler, Bourkes, African Grey, Barraband
Hello Very Sensitive Issue
It may sound foolish however I am a planner.
Does anyone have advice as to how to find a loving, lasting home for your Best Friend and my DAV Service Companion.
I am an old guy and Vietnam veteran.
My companion is a 4 year old Solomon Island Eclectus Boy.
My daughters said they will take Moses when I can no longer care for him.
I am reluctant to let them have Moses. They are Great Children however they are cat people. I am afraid Moses who has the run of my house when his feeding time is over (8 am, 12 pm, and 2 feedings in evening starting about 4:40 pm) a fruit and vegetable Kabob may be confined to his enclosure for the rest of his life which will not work for Moses who is used to sharing his home (my house) with me.
I have heard that parrots my become "pluckers" if they are depressed or lonely for companionship.
Please advise as I am open to any real good advice.
thank you and God Bless our companions with Feathers.
Larry Kiceina
I would suggest you research what bird rescue/adoption agencies are in your area. There are always a few out there & if you don't have a responsible person to relinquish the bird to, you can state in your will that you would like the bird to go to one of those rescues. A rescue is the best option because they are normally very strict on rehoming the bird & also very strict about their foster homes. They also work with avian vets to check the bird's health, test it & give whatever treatment it may need if the bird has an issue. They know what they are doing, in other words. That way you can be sure that the bird will be getting the care it needs & will only go to a proper home with someone who is experienced.
 
OP
azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #19
Thank you for your service ❀️. Moses is very beautiful and you are a wonderful pet guardian for planning for his future. It’s a hard thing to think about, but important. One of the best things you can do to ensure he has a good life if you should pass before him, is to write down, in minute detail, his daily schedule, routine, activities, likes/ dislikes, diet, the words and phrases he knows, favorite toys and foods, silly things he does, any special tricks you have for getting him to do things like step up, be quiet, take medicine, etc, and of course any medical history. Put this list with all of your other important papers and maybe put an extra copy somewhere obvious, like on the refrigerator, in case of emergency. This way, no matter where he goes, his new owner can give him the familiarity of routine.
I say this because I was on the other side of the situation where I took in a Quaker parrot who needed a new home after his owner experienced a sudden, serious medical emergency. He came with his cage, perches, toys, and enough food for a week or two. Other than that, all the info I had on him was that his name was JJ, he was 15-20 years old, had lived with the same person since he was a baby, and a few words/ phrases that he could say. This poor bird’s world was turned completely upside down in a day and I feel like the transition would have been easier if I could have known more about him to start with. However, it’s important to keep in mind that animals are adaptable. I know JJ’s life now must be very different from what it used to be, but eventually he settled in, learned a new routine and is very happy. He never engaged in any self-destructive behaviors like plucking, despite the stress he must have initially felt at all the changes.
Connecting with other bird- lovers on Facebook or other groups or through a veterinarian or local bird events can help you find a potential adoptive home for the future. Any friends you have that Moses likes could be another option. Only you know your family, but IF your daughters are responsible animal- loving people, maybe keep them as an option. If Moses has met them, at least he would be going to someone he knows. Adjustments could be made like putting the cats in another room for a few hours while Moses could come out of his cage to play and interact. Or he could have his own room like my birds do! The door has glass panels so they can still keep any eye on activity outside the room and I interact with them a lot throughout the day. You could possibly discuss these things with your daughters.
If Moses has to go to a new home due to your illness or passing some day, it will be different and, at first, difficult for him. But that doesn’t mean he can’t adjust to some changes and learn to be happy. JJ has shown me that an intelligent, one- person bird can be very happy in a new life. Wishing you and your bird the best as you consider this weighty topic.
Hello
My My you gave me such wonderful advice and my Moses does know my daughters and yes they may be able to work something out for Moses care:) also my grandchildren also love Moses as well:)
I recall 2 years ago when Moses flew away for over 16 hours before returning home hungry and tired:) I think he turned 2 years old and was looking for a red bird to mate :) (Solomon Island Eclectus boys are green and the ladies all red:) my daughters were driving from 200 miles away leaving work to come to our home in Citrus County Florida from Fort Lauderdale to help look for Moses, so yes they love him and he knows them very well. When my daughters visit he goes to sit on their laps and often says "I Love You"
Thank you again and God Bless God's Creations
Larry azflcowboy
 
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azflcowboy

azflcowboy

Active member
Oct 20, 2022
127
232
Parrots
Solomon Island Eclectus (Male)
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #20
I would suggest you research what bird rescue/adoption agencies are in your area. There are always a few out there & if you don't have a responsible person to relinquish the bird to, you can state in your will that you would like the bird to go to one of those rescues. A rescue is the best option because they are normally very strict on rehoming the bird & also very strict about their foster homes. They also work with avian vets to check the bird's health, test it & give whatever treatment it may need if the bird has an issue. They know what they are doing, in other words. That way you can be sure that the bird will be getting the care it needs & will only go to a proper home with someone who is experienced.
Hello and Thank you so much for your good advice:)
 

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