MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
Hello! I've been scrolling through this forum for a few days now reading anything I can find relevant to galah cockatoos, but decided joining the discussion myself will likely be more productive in the long run, so here I am XD

I've been in love with galah cockatoos for years now, they're one of my dream birds alongside African greys, and I'm finally at the point of craving a feathered friend in my life again after the loss of my gcc Woodstock. I'm in l my 20s, which most will consider young, but I'm also not getting any younger. My dream birds live decades, both having the capability of reaching 70 (even if it doesn't happen regularly!) I'm willing to make that lifelong commitment, but if I want a younger bird I can't wait much longer without risking leaving them behind when I pass, and that would break my heart.

To my questions: would I be a suitable home for a galah or grey?
- I'm a student at the moment and work part time as a tutor (I'm allowed to schedule my available hours)
- My courses are scheduled so that I'm never in classes longer than 3 consecutive hours, and most of the time I have an hour to return between classes to spend time with a bird and eat (1hr class, 1hr break, 1hr class, 4hr break, 1.5hr class is how most of the week is set up)
- I usually have three hours worth of class a day, five twice a week due to labs, so plenty of time to spend with a bird. One of my lab classes is also scheduled later at night after I'd like to have put said bird to bed.
- Mornings and weekends are free, though I might schedule my work hours late in the day on weekends, again after I'll have set the bird's bedtime. I know quality sleep is especially important for 'toos, as well as a proper diet. On that note,
- I have access to a supermarket quite close by so I can have fresh produce for chop and healthier treats, and I'm fairly crafty so I'm sure I can make some foraging and shreddable toys and perches.
- I have roommates, but everyone is willing to accommodate (and excited to, actually) a bird, and they have different hours than I do so they could likely keep the bird company, though not hands-on attention.
- I live close to campus (~20 mins) so I could commute from home to classes if necessary rather than live in the dorms, though that would cut out those one hour intervals between classes to return home and check on them.

I realize that galah can be loud, but I'm hoping I can emphasize mimicry over screaming contact calls as a way to get my attention, I'm even considering teaching a sort of "phone ringing" sound as a way to call me over to replace a standard contact call, I saw a galah in one of the many videos I've watched making such a sound and thought it would be perfect to utilize.

I know this is not a commitment to jump into, nor consider lightly, but my fear is that waiting longer will cut me off of this opportunity. Rescues exist (though uncommonly in my area), and they're a wonderful option to give a bird a second chance at living a happy and healthy life, but unless I find a miracle 'too or grey with very few behavioral problems to work through, I couldn't feasibly handle one at the moment. I plan on getting exclusively rescues later in my life, since adopting a baby would just set them up for heartbreak later on, but at the moment I have my heart set on a younger bird and I'd really love a galah. I know puberty tends to be rough, especially for 'toos, but I would never abandon or give up on my bird no matter how much they might decide to hate my guts during the teenage years. Sorry for such a long post, but I'd like to hear what everyone has to say with this information in mind!
 

DonnaBudgie

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Jan 24, 2023
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Hello! I've been scrolling through this forum for a few days now reading anything I can find relevant to galah cockatoos, but decided joining the discussion myself will likely be more productive in the long run, so here I am XD

I've been in love with galah cockatoos for years now, they're one of my dream birds alongside African greys, and I'm finally at the point of craving a feathered friend in my life again after the loss of my gcc Woodstock. I'm in l my 20s, which most will consider young, but I'm also not getting any younger. My dream birds live decades, both having the capability of reaching 70 (even if it doesn't happen regularly!) I'm willing to make that lifelong commitment, but if I want a younger bird I can't wait much longer without risking leaving them behind when I pass, and that would break my heart.

To my questions: would I be a suitable home for a galah or grey?
- I'm a student at the moment and work part time as a tutor (I'm allowed to schedule my available hours)
- My courses are scheduled so that I'm never in classes longer than 3 consecutive hours, and most of the time I have an hour to return between classes to spend time with a bird and eat (1hr class, 1hr break, 1hr class, 4hr break, 1.5hr class is how most of the week is set up)
- I usually have three hours worth of class a day, five twice a week due to labs, so plenty of time to spend with a bird. One of my lab classes is also scheduled later at night after I'd like to have put said bird to bed.
- Mornings and weekends are free, though I might schedule my work hours late in the day on weekends, again after I'll have set the bird's bedtime. I know quality sleep is especially important for 'toos, as well as a proper diet. On that note,
- I have access to a supermarket quite close by so I can have fresh produce for chop and healthier treats, and I'm fairly crafty so I'm sure I can make some foraging and shreddable toys and perches.
- I have roommates, but everyone is willing to accommodate (and excited to, actually) a bird, and they have different hours than I do so they could likely keep the bird company, though not hands-on attention.
- I live close to campus (~20 mins) so I could commute from home to classes if necessary rather than live in the dorms, though that would cut out those one hour intervals between classes to return home and check on them.

I realize that galah can be loud, but I'm hoping I can emphasize mimicry over screaming contact calls as a way to get my attention, I'm even considering teaching a sort of "phone ringing" sound as a way to call me over to replace a standard contact call, I saw a galah in one of the many videos I've watched making such a sound and thought it would be perfect to utilize.

I know this is not a commitment to jump into, nor consider lightly, but my fear is that waiting longer will cut me off of this opportunity. Rescues exist (though uncommonly in my area), and they're a wonderful option to give a bird a second chance at living a happy and healthy life, but unless I find a miracle 'too or grey with very few behavioral problems to work through, I couldn't feasibly handle one at the moment. I plan on getting exclusively rescues later in my life, since adopting a baby would just set them up for heartbreak later on, but at the moment I have my heart set on a younger bird and I'd really love a galah. I know puberty tends to be rough, especially for 'toos, but I would never abandon or give up on my bird no matter how much they might decide to hate my guts during the teenage years. Sorry for such a long post, but I'd like to hear what everyone has to say with this information in mind!
Aren't you planning to work full time eventually? That would mean leaving a sensitive bird alone for at least nine hours a day.
There are so many reasons why adopting a baby cockatoo is potentially a bad idea. They get separation anxiety. They scream. They may pluck. They may bite. The reality of owning one is very different from the idealized fantasy of it. The charming YouTube videos are only showing a small part of it.
 
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MorganKay

MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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Aren't you planning to work full time eventually? That would mean leaving a sensitive bird alone for at least nine hours a day.
There are so many reasons why adopting a baby cockatoo is potentially a bad idea. They get separation anxiety. They scream. They may pluck. They may bite. The reality of owning one is very different from the idealized fantasy of it. The charming YouTube videos are only showing a small part of it.
Eventually I will be working full time, yes, however I'm hoping it will be in a laboratory setting and I'll be gunning for the night shift (I swear I'm meant to be nocturnal lol!) I'm working on a major in biochemistry, and there will he times when I'm studying far more than goofing off, but the bird will still be able to hang out with me during study times. I plan on really emphasizing self entertainment and the ability to play without my undivided attention 24/7, which I hope will help with stretches of time I'll be a little more busy than usual. I recognize that as much as I try to plan every little thing out things can change in a heartbeat and all my best laid plans may fail, but I'm holding out hope that this is feasible. If not, I'll certainly put the bird's needs above my own and wait a while longer, or try to find one of those rescues to volunteer at over weekends to get my feather-fix lol
 

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Welcome to the forums!

It sounds like you’ve thought about this a lot!

While I understand where Donna is coming from, yes, adopting a baby could cause these problems to develop it doesn’t guarantee they will.
Adopting an adult bird could result the same.

I implore you to go to your local (or maybe not so local as you made it sound) parrot rescue. I’d say most of the birds there are not birds with loads of behavioral issues.
Many of them are probably younger birds that owners simply couldn’t care for but are wonderful.

I think it’s safe to keep your bird in the dorm as long as your roommates all understand the importance of safety if the bird is kept flighted and not using scents/aerosols/unsafe cookware around the bird.

I often wish that the 2 birds I have that are hand fed were not. They aren’t independent like a bird should be. I recommend you check out Pamela Clark’s blog, she has a history with toos and Greys especially and has some of the best information I’ve found on parrots anywhere.
 
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MorganKay

MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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Welcome to the forums!

It sounds like you’ve thought about this a lot!

While I understand where Donna is coming from, yes, adopting a baby could cause these problems to develop it doesn’t guarantee they will.
Adopting an adult bird could result the same.

I implore you to go to your local (or maybe not so local as you made it sound) parrot rescue. I’d say most of the birds there are not birds with loads of behavioral issues.
Many of them are probably younger birds that owners simply couldn’t care for but are wonderful.

I think it’s safe to keep your bird in the dorm as long as your roommates all understand the importance of safety if the bird is kept flighted and not using scents/aerosols/unsafe cookware around the bird.

I often wish that the 2 birds I have that are hand fed were not. They aren’t independent like a bird should be. I recommend you check out Pamela Clark’s blog, she has a history with toos and Greys especially and has some of the best information I’ve found on parrots anywhere.
Thank you for the recommendation, I'll definitely check out that blog! I'll try to find a rescue I can visit, but most I found were hours away from my current residence :(
My roommates all know and understand the importance of avoiding the most common toxic household items, thankfully, and lucky for me my campus has actually banned quite a few other hazards for being too... well, hazardous I suppose lol! That includes candles and many plug-in fresheners (they are considered fire hazards, and two dorm buildings had burned down years ago due to zero regulation, so the college cracks down on violations quite quickly with large fines.)

And yes, I've been thinking and researching for some time, as a pet (no matter the species or level of care necessary) deserves to have a home to thrive in with the best care possible to live their longest and happiest lives. From fish to parrots to a colony of ants, I would never consider caring for something without knowing what I'm getting into and what this little life I'm now responsible for will need for the extent of their life. Life is precious, and infinitely more so when we decide to take their care into our own two hands :)
 

DonnaBudgie

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Welcome to the forums!

It sounds like you’ve thought about this a lot!

While I understand where Donna is coming from, yes, adopting a baby could cause these problems to develop it doesn’t guarantee they will.
Adopting an adult bird could result the same.

I implore you to go to your local (or maybe not so local as you made it sound) parrot rescue. I’d say most of the birds there are not birds with loads of behavioral issues.
Many of them are probably younger birds that owners simply couldn’t care for but are wonderful.

I think it’s safe to keep your bird in the dorm as long as your roommates all understand the importance of safety if the bird is kept flighted and not using scents/aerosols/unsafe cookware around the bird.

I often wish that the 2 birds I have that are hand fed were not. They aren’t independent like a bird should be. I recommend you check out Pamela Clark’s blog, she has a history with toos and Greys especially and has some of the best information I’ve found on parrots anywhere.
Of course adopting a baby 'too doesn't guarantee problems- that'd why I used the words "potentially" and "may" in my response to your post. Problem behaviors can easily happen in older birds, too.
I've never heard of any college or university that allowed pets in dorms for many reasons like damage, noise, and the health concerns of its' students (allergies). A cockatoo requires a huge cage and most dorm rooms barely have enough room for the human occupants! Dorm living isn't a very stable living situation either. Roommates change frequently and future roommates may not be as thrilled to have a screaming parrot for a roommate when trying to study for exams. All it would take is for one roommate to complain to the school and the bird would be out! And what if a roommate gets a cat or a dog?
As a student, do you have access to an avian vet for a Cockatoo? Can you afford at least two and potentially more vet visits a year?
I agree with Zero about trying to adopt a more mature bird. They don't all have behavior problems- some were given up because the bird didn't fit into the prior owners' lifestyle. Apartment dwellers are threatened with eviction all the time due to noisy parrots.
However, I think it would be wiser to wait to adopt a cockatoo until your living situation is more settled. In the meantime, if your dorm really does allow birds, a cockatiel would make a charming, much more manageable companion for you at this stage in your life and satisfy some of your understandable urge to cuddle with a ball of feathers!

If you eventually get a baby 'too, don't make the mistake of cuddling with it too much! It's so tempting to do because they're so sweet and so soft but I made that mistake with a baby Goffin's I adopted many years ago and I created a monster that was only happy when receiving a full body massage.
 
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MorganKay

MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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Of course adopting a baby 'too doesn't guarantee problems- that'd why I used the words "potentially" and "may" in my response to your post. Problem behaviors can easily happen in older birds, too.
I've never heard of any college or university that allowed pets in dorms for many reasons like damage, noise, and the health concerns of its' students (allergies). A cockatoo requires a huge cage and most dorm rooms barely have enough room for the human occupants! Dorm living isn't a very stable living situation either. Roommates change frequently and future roommates may not be as thrilled to have a screaming parrot for a roommate when trying to study for exams. All it would take is for one roommate to complain to the school and the bird would be out! And what if a roommate gets a cat or a dog?
As a student, do you have access to an avian vet for a Cockatoo? Can you afford at least two and potentially more vet visits a year?
I agree with Zero about trying to adopt a more mature bird. They don't all have behavior problems- some were given up because the bird didn't fit into the prior owners' lifestyle. Apartment dwellers are threatened with eviction all the time due to noisy parrots.
However, I think it would be wiser to wait to adopt a cockatoo until your living situation is more settled. In the meantime, if your dorm really does allow birds, a cockatiel would make a charming, much more manageable companion for you at this stage in your life and satisfy some of your understandable urge to cuddle with a ball of feathers!

If you eventually get a baby 'too, don't make the mistake of cuddling with it too much! It's so tempting to do because they're so sweet and so soft but I made that mistake with a baby Goffin's I adopted many years ago and I created a monster that was only happy when receiving a full body massage.
I've had the same roommates for two years (four semesters) because we worked out quite well, but that possibility of changing roommates or damages to room is also why I mentioned that I'm capable of commuting to campus instead and living at home, as I'm only about 20 mins away. Would that be a better option than attempting to live on-campus?
I have access to an avian veterinarian that my family has been seen by for over a decade, and she's absolutely wonderful.
As for space, my dorm is sort of like an apartment: a single large living area with connected kitchen and two separate bedrooms on either side with separate bathrooms, two people per room. I have a "special circumstances pass", I suppose, that allows me to have a pet on campus so long as roommates sign an agreement and the pet is up to date on papers and checkups, with no species-specific exceptions to my understanding. Seeing as my roommates do not have this same privilege, I wouldn't have to worry about the addition of a dog or cat. The common room area is large enough for us four to do our work without being on top of one another, and also acts as a way to store things that might otherwise take up quite a bit of room in the bedrooms (books, movies, game consoles, etc) so I would have space to have a fairly large cage. Speaking of, would this cage be appropriate for a galah? If not, should I be going for something double the size? I know that bigger is always better, but is this a good starting point?
Screenshot_20230611_165927_Amazon Shopping.jpg
(In case the image is grainy, the two back sides are 30 inches, the front planes are 18", 16.5", and 18", and the hypotenuse is 42", with a height of 63.5" though I'm sure the wheels are included in that. I also linked to the Amazon listing)

I've heard of the behavioral issues too much cuddling can cause and I'm hoping to avoid such things, instead making sure to teach them how to play on their own and hang out without being on me all the time. I certainly made that mistake with my GCC, little strip of velcro he was lol. He'd only attack toys out of frustration because I wouldn't let him sit leaned into my neck on my shoulder! Far more manageable than a frustrated 'too though I'm sure.

I'll be sure to try and check out a rescue, I know that adult birds will have a more settled personality which can make it far easier to find one who will work with my own personality! If, in the end, I come to the conclusion that introducing a galah would be a detriment to the bird, I will certainly see about a smaller buddy.
 

DonnaBudgie

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I've had the same roommates for two years (four semesters) because we worked out quite well, but that possibility of changing roommates or damages to room is also why I mentioned that I'm capable of commuting to campus instead and living at home, as I'm only about 20 mins away. Would that be a better option than attempting to live on-campus?
I have access to an avian veterinarian that my family has been seen by for over a decade, and she's absolutely wonderful.
As for space, my dorm is sort of like an apartment: a single large living area with connected kitchen and two separate bedrooms on either side with separate bathrooms, two people per room. I have a "special circumstances pass", I suppose, that allows me to have a pet on campus so long as roommates sign an agreement and the pet is up to date on papers and checkups, with no species-specific exceptions to my understanding. Seeing as my roommates do not have this same privilege, I wouldn't have to worry about the addition of a dog or cat. The common room area is large enough for us four to do our work without being on top of one another, and also acts as a way to store things that might otherwise take up quite a bit of room in the bedrooms (books, movies, game consoles, etc) so I would have space to have a fairly large cage. Speaking of, would this cage be appropriate for a galah? If not, should I be going for something double the size? I know that bigger is always better, but is this a good starting point?
View attachment 51410
(In case the image is grainy, the two back sides are 30 inches, the front planes are 18", 16.5", and 18", and the hypotenuse is 42", with a height of 63.5" though I'm sure the wheels are included in that. I also linked to the Amazon listing)

I've heard of the behavioral issues too much cuddling can cause and I'm hoping to avoid such things, instead making sure to teach them how to play on their own and hang out without being on me all the time. I certainly made that mistake with my GCC, little strip of velcro he was lol. He'd only attack toys out of frustration because I wouldn't let him sit leaned into my neck on my shoulder! Far more manageable than a frustrated 'too though I'm sure.

I'll be sure to try and check out a rescue, I know that adult birds will have a more settled personality which can make it far easier to find one who will work with my own personality! If, in the end, I come to the conclusion that introducing a galah would be a detriment to the bird, I will certainly see about a smaller buddy.
I understand your roommate situation now. I would still be concerned that a Galah like all cockatoos can be very loud and a roommate that has previously consented to getting a bird might change their mind when they realize they can't sleep past sunrise and must study with headphones. Most of the time the problem with loud birds is with the people in the neighboring apartments. Parrot screams travel well and if they complain you may have a problem. The fact that you have the option of moving home if the need arises makes it much easier.
A Galah isn't an enormous cockatoo- just a bit larger than a Goffin's. I happen to like the corner cage you are considering. It has some horizontal bars for easy climbing, a seed catching apron for the mess, a flat top, and the longest internal dimension is 42" left to right. I think its big enough for Galah if you plan lots of out of cage time. Corner cages allow you to utilize a corner in the room that would otherwise be wasted space but can also be used against a flat wall if need be.
 

DonnaBudgie

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I understand your roommate situation now. I would still be concerned that a Galah like all cockatoos can be very loud and a roommate that has previously consented to getting a bird might change their mind when they realize they can't sleep past sunrise and must study with headphones. Most of the time the problem with loud birds is with the people in the neighboring apartments. Parrot screams travel well and if they complain you may have a problem. The fact that you have the option of moving home if the need arises makes it much easier.
A Galah isn't an enormous cockatoo- just a bit larger than a Goffin's. I happen to like the corner cage you are considering. It has some horizontal bars for easy climbing, a seed catching apron for the mess, a flat top, and the longest internal dimension is 42" left to right. I think its big enough for Galah if you plan lots of out of cage time. Corner cages allow you to utilize a corner in the room that would otherwise be wasted space but can also be used against a flat wall if need be.
One thing for sure- don't count in being able to control the noise with training.
Do you live in a place where if you get a job after you graduate living at home with your bird would be a possibility? I say that because your family home is close to your college. Is it also close to jib opportunities? I was a medical lab science major in Boston when I was in college and if my folks lived close to Boston where there were lots of job opportunities it would have been ideal when having a somewhat difficult to house pet bird. Once you graduate and get a real apartment you won't have the ability to get special permission to have a loud pet bird and many landlords don't allow pets at all and a loud parrot is hard to hide from neighbors.
 
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MorganKay

MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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One thing for sure- don't count in being able to control the noise with training.
Do you live in a place where if you get a job after you graduate living at home with your bird would be a possibility? I say that because your family home is close to your college. Is it also close to jib opportunities? I was a medical lab science major in Boston when I was in college and if my folks lived close to Boston where there were lots of job opportunities it would have been ideal when having a somewhat difficult to house pet bird. Once you graduate and get a real apartment you won't have the ability to get special permission to have a loud pet bird and many landlords don't allow pets at all and a loud parrot is hard to hide from neighbors.
This is definitely true, and I'll have to look at that more closely. I'll consult my chemistry professor about that, as she's usually the one to help people find placements in labs. There are quite a few job opportunities I can find just searching on Indeed that are in my area or close enough that commute is feasible without being an inconvenience, and I meet the qualifications for some already. Doesn't guarantee a hire, but opportunities exist.
 
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MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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I understand your roommate situation now. I would still be concerned that a Galah like all cockatoos can be very loud and a roommate that has previously consented to getting a bird might change their mind when they realize they can't sleep past sunrise and must study with headphones. Most of the time the problem with loud birds is with the people in the neighboring apartments. Parrot screams travel well and if they complain you may have a problem. The fact that you have the option of moving home if the need arises makes it much easier.
A Galah isn't an enormous cockatoo- just a bit larger than a Goffin's. I happen to like the corner cage you are considering. It has some horizontal bars for easy climbing, a seed catching apron for the mess, a flat top, and the longest internal dimension is 42" left to right. I think its big enough for Galah if you plan lots of out of cage time. Corner cages allow you to utilize a corner in the room that would otherwise be wasted space but can also be used against a flat wall if need be.
That's true. The walls aren't thin, but they sure aren't sound proofed either lol! Do you think, if I were to give this a try, introducing neighbors to the bird could increase the likelihood of tolerance during noisy periods? If the galah were to start up some yelling, would it be possible to distract from the behavior with target training and performing tricks instead?

Also, I greatly appreciate all that's been said so far, it really helps to have an outside perspective (especially since I'm admittedly biased towards getting a bird lol). Addressing the potential problems that can arise from dorm living has been beneficial, as well as considering contingency plans.
 
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MorganKay

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Forgot to mention, whenever I'm home I'll have the bird out and about with me, or at least playing on a nice stand outside of the cage. I hope to have them harness trained so I'll be able to take them outside as well for much needed sunshine as well as flight, because one thing I've seen and read repeatedly is the importance of flight to galahs in particular, given how prone they are to fatty liver disease, obesity, and lipomas.
 

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Does your dorm allow pets? Have you ever been in a room with a screaming cockatoo? I have; it’s loud enough to damage your hearing! You can hear a galah screaming inside a house from down the street. I cannot imagine a cockatoo of any variety in a dorm situation; it would be unfair to the other residents and the bird.

A grey would be quieter but they can be very nervous and high strung and require a lot of enrichment. They are also not usually cuddly although that depends on the bird. I had a rescued timneh for a while, when I was in college, in a house with roommates and even though she wasn’t very loud, they found her irritating.

I ended up having to rehome her as my life situation changed drastically once I was out of school, as I imagine yours will. I regret that all the time, and it’s been over ten years. Obviously you are not me and perhaps it will work out for you, but that’s a huge commitment at a time when your life is going to be full of rapid changes.
 
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MorganKay

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Does your dorm allow pets? Have you ever been in a room with a screaming cockatoo? I have; it’s loud enough to damage your hearing! You can hear a galah screaming inside a house from down the street. I cannot imagine a cockatoo of any variety in a dorm situation; it would be unfair to the other residents and the bird.

A grey would be quieter but they can be very nervous and high strung and require a lot of enrichment. They are also not usually cuddly although that depends on the bird. I had a rescued timneh for a while, when I was in college, in a house with roommates and even though she wasn’t very loud, they found her irritating.

I ended up having to rehome her as my life situation changed drastically once I was out of school, as I imagine yours will. I regret that all the time, and it’s been over ten years. Obviously you are not me and perhaps it will work out for you, but that’s a huge commitment at a time when your life is going to be full of rapid changes.
Thank you, this is a thought provoking addition. I'll be checking with family members, but hopefully if something were to come up or happen my family could temporarily take over care until I got back on solid ground were something to occur once out of school. Do you think if I were to bring my roommates to a rescue I visited it would better help gage their tolerance of various birds? Would this be something beneficial to offer? Or should I not bother and instead plan to commute to campus and scrap the idea of staying in a dorm altogether?

I'd also like to add that money will not be too much of a concern for me at the moment. I have good scholarships that cover parts of tuition and board and then VA benefits from veterans in the family that cover the rest, a savings account with a decent amount so far, and additional benefits that'll kick in soon and afford me a monthly stipend for some years that'll also end up straight in a savings/emergency funds account. I also have a part-time job that generally affords me around $100-150 spending money every two weeks, so I'd have the funds for food and toys, and only have two bills to pay per month that barely make a dent in job money. Two or three years left in undergrad depending on whether I go through with the double major, all covered. Would this be adequate financial stability for the moment, excluding any potential help from family?
 

saxguy64

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First off, I love your enthusiasm and that you're doing your research. Good on you! I'll just throw a few thoughts out there.

In doing your research, seriously, if you can spend time at a rescue, do it. Not necessarily to find a bird right off, but to spend time with lots of them, and gaining invaluable experience and understanding of the daily demands of caring for them, good, bad , and ugly. Also, you'll get an idea of the real side of different species, and may decide something you hadn't considered would wind up being just right for you. When the time comes, keeping an open mind, and allowing the parrot to choose you almost always makes for a better fit.

Another thing to consider. I don't know about your current situation with roommates, but in my own experience, roommates come and go, so getting the current ones on board may have no relevance to who's around next month, year, whatever, and this is a commitment far longer than that. Also, if you're in any kind of apartment, even if your roommates are okay with it, other tenants are likely not, and it's not uncommon for landlords to flat out say no because of the potential noise level.
 
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MorganKay

MorganKay

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Thinking of a galah!
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First off, I love your enthusiasm and that you're doing your research. Good on you! I'll just throw a few thoughts out there.

In doing your research, seriously, if you can spend time at a rescue, do it. Not necessarily to find a bird right off, but to spend time with lots of them, and gaining invaluable experience and understanding of the daily demands of caring for them, good, bad , and ugly. Also, you'll get an idea of the real side of different species, and may decide something you hadn't considered would wind up being just right for you. When the time comes, keeping an open mind, and allowing the parrot to choose you almost always makes for a better fit.

Another thing to consider. I don't know about your current situation with roommates, but in my own experience, roommates come and go, so getting the current ones on board may have no relevance to who's around next month, year, whatever, and this is a commitment far longer than that. Also, if you're in any kind of apartment, even if your roommates are okay with it, other tenants are likely not, and it's not uncommon for landlords to flat out say no because of the potential noise level.
Alright, I'll definitely make my way to a rescue when I can then!

I got lucky with my roommates. We're all friends, but don't spend too much time together where it's unbearable to be in the same house because we're always socializing lol. We were even considering looking into apartment sharing after college, as we all need to stick around the area for a while. I think that could easily be turned into co-renting a house in the area rather than an apartment though, seeing as there are a decent number in the area we could afford and there would be more room for everyone that way. We've been roommates for two years now, and this upcoming year will be the same! Would renting a house be a better option than an apartment once I reach that point of my life if I were to get a bird due to the potential (and likely) noise?

The main repeated concern seems to be the roommates and dorm/apartment living, so would I be correct in saying living at home and commuting would be a better choice for me and the bird? I'm secure for the next three years unless I were to decide to transfer colleges (unlikely), and after that I recognize the possibility of future change. After that amount of time, would I have a better gage on whether the bird would be suitable for an apartment, as far as noise goes? I know 'toos, as well as most other parrots, can experience seemingly drastic personality shifts during puberty, but I've seen mixed responses on when galahs reach sexual maturity, only that it tends to happen sooner than white 'toos; when could I expect a galah to have "settled" in mannerisms?
 

Keet_Krazy

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Feb 19, 2023
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Galah:
Quarter (Not DNA'd)
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Hello! I have a "Baby" Galah (18 months, possibly 2 now. I don't know his exact age.). I can help with some questions where I can but I don't consider myself to have much, if any, experience, especially in a normal household setting.
I am personally against strangers on the internet making decisions for others. Because you are the only one who knows all the details about you're situation. If you're truly committed to this idea, waiting a few years till you have a little more stability would not be wrong.
Some of the things I've read about galahs is basically they're one of the "easier" 'toos... till they're not.
 

LoveOfallAnimals

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Alright, I'll definitely make my way to a rescue when I can then!

I got lucky with my roommates. We're all friends, but don't spend too much time together where it's unbearable to be in the same house because we're always socializing lol. We were even considering looking into apartment sharing after college, as we all need to stick around the area for a while. I think that could easily be turned into co-renting a house in the area rather than an apartment though, seeing as there are a decent number in the area we could afford and there would be more room for everyone that way. We've been roommates for two years now, and this upcoming year will be the same! Would renting a house be a better option than an apartment once I reach that point of my life if I were to get a bird due to the potential (and likely) noise?

The main repeated concern seems to be the roommates and dorm/apartment living, so would I be correct in saying living at home and commuting would be a better choice for me and the bird? I'm secure for the next three years unless I were to decide to transfer colleges (unlikely), and after that I recognize the possibility of future change. After that amount of time, would I have a better gage on whether the bird would be suitable for an apartment, as far as noise goes? I know 'toos, as well as most other parrots, can experience seemingly drastic personality shifts during puberty, but I've seen mixed responses on when galahs reach sexual maturity, only that it tends to happen sooner than white 'toos; when could I expect a galah to have "settled" in mannerism
I would be shocked if sound did not become a problem in the dorms or an apartment with a 'too. I have seen many parrots have to be rehomed for this reason. Both 'toos and greys are dusty birds and until people are around them they may not know whether or not they are allergic or just handle the level of dust that they create. Those would be my two biggest concerns.
 

DonnaBudgie

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Jan 24, 2023
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That's true. The walls aren't thin, but they sure aren't sound proofed either lol! Do you think, if I were to give this a try, introducing neighbors to the bird could increase the likelihood of tolerance during noisy periods? If the galah were to start up some yelling, would it be possible to distract from the behavior with target training and performing tricks instead?

Also, I greatly appreciate all that's been said so far, it really helps to have an outside perspective (especially since I'm admittedly biased towards getting a bird lol). Addressing the potential problems that can arise from dorm living has been beneficial, as well as considering contingency plans.
I think neighbors will be nice until the noise bothers them. Then not so much. I have no idea how well you can train a Galah not to disturb neighbors. Especially when you're not home. How can you control that?
 

Keet_Krazy

Well-known member
Feb 19, 2023
291
688
Parrots
Budgies:
Obsidian (M), Snowflake (F), Sunbeam (F), Emelia (F, English), Winston (M, English)
Galah:
Quarter (Not DNA'd)
Other:
Quail and Chickens
That earlier post was early morning me, so here's another from more awake me with some actual information ;)
NOISE
: In a way I consider my galah quiet... but I also put zero limit on his noise. He's an outdoor "aviary bird", so he gets to be noisy and as loud as he wants. This is generally normal noisy galah times, morning, evening, before a storm, whenever a flock of wild cockatoos is around, etc.
Here's a clip of one of his louder times (I don't think this is his loudest).
(Also he is quite a good mimic, but birds are individual and some may have no interest in mimicry)

Cockatoos scream for fun. That's something 'too owners have to accept. It's not entirely fair for us to expect them to never scream.

 Dust: Anyone who tells you a galah is not dusty either doesn't own one or is just plain lying! If you want to go ahead with getting a galah please ensure both you and your roommates are aware and educated on the effects of bird dust to  your health.

I feel like I had a third point I wanted to comment on but can't remember what it was 😅
 

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